2022 Beijing Winter Olympics Guidance for Journalists


Ahead of the start of the Beijing Winter Olympics, the Asian American Journalists Association has compiled a series of guides, resources and organizational stances to help inform journalists and their coverage. AAJA advises journalists to:  Consult with native speakers on the proper pronunciation and romanization or spelling of Asian and Pacific Islander language names and … Continue reading 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics Guidance for Journalists

Guidance on Coverage of Sept. 11, 20 Years Later


This September marks 20 years since the 9/11 attacks. The Arab and Middle Eastern Journalists Association (AMEJA), Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA), the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), and the South Asian Journalists Association (SAJA), all independent professional organizations, are issuing guidance to help journalists and newsrooms more accurately and critically cover the commemoration, impacted communities, and policies that resulted from 9/11.

AAJA Pacific Islander Task Force Urges Mindful Reporting in Coverage of Indigenous Pacific Islanders


As coverage of the Tokyo Olympics continues, The Asian American Journalists Association’s (AAJA) Pacific Islander Task Force urges media organizations to be mindful in their reporting not to perpetuate stereotypes about Indigenous Pacific Islanders in headlines and coverage.

AAJA MediaWatch urges Vice Media Group and other outlets to be vigilant about AAPI misrepresentation


After an editorial lapse by Vice Media, the Asian American Journalists Association’s (AAJA’s) MediaWatch Committee urges Vice Media Group and other media outlets to be vigilant about their representation of Asians and Asian American and Pacific Islander communities.

SAJA-AAJA Media Advisory on Coverage of Indianapolis Fedex Facility Shooting


We are concerned about reports Tuesday that the Minnesota state police threatened to arrest journalists covering the protests if they did not leave. This growing nationwide trend among law enforcement agencies is unacceptable. The police should not be threatening journalists for doing their jobs. As journalism organizations, we stand together to defend reporters on the streets who are covering the news as the eyes and ears of the people.

We encourage and urge all police offices to respect our jobs and not threaten working journalists or peaceful protesters, both of whom are protected by the First Amendment, with arrest.

AAJA Joins Minnesota Chapter and SPJ-Minnesota in Denouncing Targeting and Detention of Journalists Doing Their Jobs


We are concerned about reports Tuesday that the Minnesota state police threatened to arrest journalists covering the protests if they did not leave. This growing nationwide trend among law enforcement agencies is unacceptable. The police should not be threatening journalists for doing their jobs. As journalism organizations, we stand together to defend reporters on the streets who are covering the news as the eyes and ears of the people.

We encourage and urge all police offices to respect our jobs and not threaten working journalists or peaceful protesters, both of whom are protected by the First Amendment, with arrest.

AAJA Encourages Newsrooms to Empower AAPI Journalists and Their Expertise


On behalf of our broadcast members nationwide, the Broadcast Advisory Council of the Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA) urges newsrooms to empower their Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) journalists by recognizing both the unique value they bring to the coverage of the Atlanta shootings and the invisible labor they regularly take on, especially in newsrooms where they are severely underrepresented.